quality

quality 1 Quality, property, character, attribute, accidentall denote one of the intelligible marks or indications by means of which a thing may be identified or its constitution be understood.
Quality is the term of widest application and may designate any such mark, material or immaterial, individual or generic
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distinguishing qualities of iron are tensile strength and corrosiveness

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there was only one quality in a woman that appealed to him—charm— Galsworthy

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the persistent contemporariness that is a quality of all good art— Huxley

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her self-conscious . . . awkwardness lent her a dangerous amateur qualitySalinger

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A property is a quality that is proper to a species or type; it therefore belongs to a thing by virtue of that thing's true or essential nature
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the eye has this strange property: it rests only in beauty— Woolf

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rhythm is a property of words— Rickword

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Sir Joseph Thomson . . . pointed out that weight is only an "apparently" invariable property of matter— Ellisy}}

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A character is a peculiar or distinctive quality more often of a class than of an individual. The term is used especially in scientific and philosophical writing with reference to the properties which distinguish an isolable subgroup (as a species) within a larger group (as a genus)
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wheat and oats share the properties of cereal grasses but have specific characters that clearly differentiate them

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hauynite and noselite show characters like sodalite, but they differ from it in containing the radical S04 in the place of chlorine— Pirsson

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An attribute is a quality that is ascribed to a thing. The term may imply a lack of definite knowledge of the thing in question; thus, one can speak of the attributes of God, meaning the qualities men ascribe to him
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to endow her with all the attributes of a mythological paragon upon Olympus— Wylie

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historical personages become invested with romantic attributesWright

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More often attribute denotes a quality that, though ascribed, is felt as an essential concomitant which must belong to a thing by reason of its nature
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mercy is . . . an attribute to God himself— Shak.

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this Confederation had none of the attributes of sovereignty in legislative, executive, or judicial power— Taney

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An accident basically is a nonessential trait; in philosophical use, however, the term often means one of the qualities by which a thing manifests itself and implies, therefore, a contrast with the substance—or the real, but unapparent, nature—of the thing
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waves [on a Japanese artist's screen] such as these, divested of all accident of appearance, in their naked impetus of movement and recoil— Binyon

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In more general use accident usually implies fortuitousness or lack of intrinsic value
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rhyme is ... an accident rather than an essential of verse— Lowes

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Certainly many mystics have been ascetic. But that has been the accident of their philosophy, and not the essence of their religion— Ellis

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Analogous words: predication, affirmation (see corresponding verbs at ASSERT): peculiarity, individuality, characteristic (see corresponding adjectives at CHARACTERISTIC)
2 Quality, stature, caliber are often interchangeable as indicating, when used without modifiers, distinctive merit or superiority.
Quality implies a complex of qualities (see QUALITY 1) and is therefore always singular in use. The term usually implies a high order of excellence, virtue, strength of character, or worth
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splendid writing, of course, but to no purpose .... It's not quality we look for in a novel, but mileage— Purdy

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they're all made by machinery now. The quality may be inferior, but that doesn't matter. It's the cost of production that counts— Dahl

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this little Tania had quality; she carried her scars without a whimper— Bambrick

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Stature implies that the one considered has reached or is in process of reaching the height or greatness possible to one of his kind
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probings in the realms of life and matter have seemed to diminish man's stature and to belittle his dignity— Marquand

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every piece of work you do adds something to your stature, increases the power and maturity of your experience— Wolfe

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Caliber suggests extent or range especially of one's mind or powers; it may connote unusual but measurable range, scope, or breadth of ability or intellect but often depends on qualification to supply a standard of reference or comparison or to indicate the direction of deviation from the norm
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a man of high moral caliber

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the milieu of her youth where the size of the engagement ring determines the caliber of the bridegroom— Geismar

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is at his relaxed best because he is accompanied by musicians of the first caliberJohn Hammond

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pundits of big and little caliberCraig Thompson

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Analogous words: *excellence, virtue: value, *worth

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Quality — degree to which a set of inherent characteristics fulfils requirements (p. 3.1.1 ISO 9000:2005). Источник …   Словарь-справочник терминов нормативно-технической документации

  • Quality — • Various definitions of quality and its forms or divisions Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Quality     Quality     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Quality — Qual i*ty, n.; pl. {Qualities}. [F. qualit[ e], L. qualitas, fr. qualis how constituted, as; akin to E. which. See {Which}.] 1. The condition of being of such and such a sort as distinguished from others; nature or character relatively considered …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • quality — qual·i·ty n pl ties 1: a special, distinctive, or essential character: as a: a character, position, or role assumed those acts of ownership, which the person called to the succession can only do in quality of heir Louisiana Civil Code b: the… …   Law dictionary

  • quality — [kwôl′ə tē, kwäl′ə tē] n. pl. qualities [ME qualite < OFr < L qualitas < qualis, of what kind: see QUALE] 1. any of the features that make something what it is; characteristic element; attribute 2. basic nature; character; kind 3. the… …   English World dictionary

  • quality — (n.) c.1300, temperament, character, disposition. from O.Fr. qualite (12c., Mod.Fr. qualité), from L. qualitatem (nom. qualitas; said to have been coined by Cicero to translate Gk. poiotes), from qualis of what sort, from PIE pronomial base *kwo… …   Etymology dictionary

  • quality — [n1] characteristic, feature affection, affirmation, aspect, attribute, character, condition, constitution, description, element, endowment, essence, factor, genius, individuality, kind, make, mark, name of tune*, nature, nature of beast*,… …   New thesaurus

  • Quality — Quality. См. Качество. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • quality — is descriptive of organic composition of substance, expressed in definite quantitative units, and definitive of character, nature and degree of excellence of an article. Dean Rubber Mfg. Co. v. U. S., C.A.Mo., 356 F.2d 161, 163. In respect to… …   Black's law dictionary

  • quality — ► NOUN (pl. qualities) 1) the degree of excellence of something as measured against other similar things. 2) general excellence. 3) a distinctive attribute or characteristic. 4) archaic high social standing. ORIGIN Latin qualitas, from qualis of… …   English terms dictionary

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